Courses

  • Crowdsourcing Cultural Heritage

    Crowdsourcing projects often make news because they can be incredibly productive, generating millions of lines of text, identifying forgotten faces in historical photographs and even finding new planets. Successful crowdsourcing projects can help organizations forge deeper connection with audiences. We’ll look at the attributes of projects that successfully engage the public with their content and tasks, whether transcribing handwritten documents, correcting optical character recognition (OCR) errors in printed text, identifying animals on the Serengeti or folding proteins. Conversely, poorly-designed crowdsourcing projects find it difficult to attract or retain participants. This class will present international case studies of best practice crowdsourcing projects to illustrate the range of tasks that can be crowdsourced, the motivations of participants and the characteristics of well-designed . . . More Details
  • De/Post/Colonial Digital Humanities

    “…we must discuss, we must invent…” —Frantz Fanon, The Wretched of the Earth From Sandra Harding’s interventions in postcolonial science studies to Radhika Gajjala’s articulation of digital subalternity to Kavita Philip’s work on postcolonial computing, postcolonial approaches to technology have provoked lively discussion. New conversations have emerged around essential questions: can the digital be “decolonized?”; what are the limits of decolonial, postcolonial, or anti-colonial approaches to digital cultures?; and how can these theoretical approaches be marshaled to build communities, tools, and justice? Together, we will explore these questions at the intersections of theory and praxis as we consider how tools can be theorized, hacked, and used in service of decolonization. This course undertakes this task through three goals: 1) learning . . . More Details
  • Digital Pedagogy and Networked Learning

    Many argue digital humanities is about building stuff and sharing stuff, reframing the work we do in the humanities as less consumptive and more curatorial—less solitary and more collaborative. In this workshop, participants will experiment with ways technology can be used to build learning communities within the classroom, while also thinking about how we can connect our students to a much larger global classroom. We’ll start at the level of the syllabus, thinking about how we organize and structure hybrid courses and digital assignments, before delving into specific tools and critical orientations to technology. Participants should expect that the workshop will be hands-on, collaborative, and iterative; we will be using and building, experimenting with the pedagogy we are learning, making . . . More Details
  • Digital Storytelling

    When YouTube launched to the public in 2005, the now-ubiquitous red play-button logo contained a simple yet powerful tagline, “Broadcast Yourself.” Inherent in such an imperative is a concept that’s at the core of this course — in today’s wired world, digital video is a powerful storytelling medium, one that can influence constructions of identity, community, culture, and the nature of narrative itself. In this course, we’ll explore the interactivity and narrative of digital video by positioning it as a tool for seeing, exploring, expressing and critiquing within the digital Humanities. We will look at the various forms of dynamic storytelling, investigate the history of the video medium and what bearing it plays on the broadcast zeitgeist of today, explore . . . More Details
  • Getting Started with Data, Tools, and Platforms

    Starting a digital humanities research project can be quite intimidating. This course is designed to make that process less so by exploring tools and platforms that support digital humanities research, analysis, and publication. We will begin by reframing sources as data that enable digital research. We will work throughout the week on approaches to (1) finding, evaluating, and acquiring (2) cleaning and preparing (3) exploring (4) analyzing (5) communicating and sharing data. Emphasis will be placed across all stages on how to manage a beginner digital research project in such a way that helps to ensure that your project remains accessible, that the process is well documented, and that the data are reusable. Throughout this course, we will examine several . . . More Details
  • Humanities Data Curation Praxis

    This course is for people who have or are making textured, rich humanities data and want to be able to use, share, and preserve their information. We will take a multi-faceted approach to the challenges of curating data that integrates * immediate, practical concerns of preparing, transforming, and analyzing data, * strategic tasks of mapping data models and developing maintenance plans, * and foundational thinking about the role of data curation in research. We will move between hands-on work with data sets and tools to discussions about the nature of data curation. Working with the tools like IPython notebooks and OpenRefine and with open data sets in a variety of formats from institutions like the Metropolitan Museum and the Digital . . . More Details
  • Humanities Programming

    This course focuses on introducing participants to humanities programming through the creation and use of the Ruby on Rails web application framework. This course will introduce programming and design concepts, project management and planning, workflow, as well as the design, implementation, and deployment of a web-based application. Technologies covered in this course will include git, HTML, CSS, JavaScript, Ruby, Rails, and relational (and non-relational) data stores. Over the course of the week, we will work through the practical implementation of a developing and deploying a small-scale web application. If you intend to bring your own laptop, you will need to have administrative rights in order to install software.   More Details
  • Large-Scale Text Analysis with R

    Text mining, the practice of using computational and statistical analysis on large collections of digitized text, is becoming an increasingly important way of extracting meaning from writing. Whether working on survey data, medical records, political speeches or even digitized collections of historical writing, we are now able to use the power of computational algorithms to extract patterns from vast quantities of textual data. This technique gives us information we could never access by simply reading the texts. But determining which patterns have meaning and which answer key questions about our data is a difficult task, both conceptually and methodologically; particularly for those who work in the humanities who are able to benefit the most from these methods. Large-Scale Text Analysis . . . More Details
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